Blogger's Corner - Fracking News

The U.S. shale oil boom is recovering from the crash faster than almost anyone imagined, OPEC included.

By Kamran Ardestani 02 June, 2017

OPEC's decision in late 2014 to pump oil at high levels launched a devastating price war. It sent oil prices to 13-year lows, dealing a big blow to the shale revolution. Dozens of American producers fell into bankruptcy and countless oil workers lost jobs.

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opec , usa , america , oil ,
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Kamran Ardestani

The Pattison family has more than a 60-year history of contributing to their community and providing jobs and economic stability to the people of the region.

Today, Pattison Sand Company operates in Clayton, IA about 13 miles south of Prairie du Chien, WI on the banks of the Mississippi River. We employ upwards of 300 people. Pattison leads the charge towards American Energy Independence by producing industrial sand for the natural gas and oil industries. Pattison mines this sand from the St. Peter sandstone layer in both underground and surface mines.

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